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PowerTap - Training with power - Part 3

This is the third and final guide in our series of guides on 'Training with Power'. In our Part 1 Guide we considered the advantages of training with a power meter, in our Part 2 Guide we discussed some productive training sessions that you could do with your power meter out on the road or trails. In this Part 3 guide we consider indoor training sessions that are tailored to training with a power meter.


Example session 1: "The TT Turbo Booster"

This is an ideal session for those looking to increase their strength during time trials and also a great session for triathletes.

  • Warm Up P1: 10 minutes at a moderate pace (around 200 watts for most)
  • Warm Up P2: 10 minutes of cadence micro-bursts: 30 seconds 115RPM, 90 seconds easy pedaling (repeat 5 times)
  • Main Set 1: 10 Sets of 1 min at 125% FTP - 30 seconds easy spinning
  • Recover: 5 minutes spin it out
  • Main Set 2: 10 Sets of 1 min at 125% FTP - 30 seconds easy spinning
  • Recover: 5 minutes spin it out
  • Main Set 3: 10 Sets of 1 min at 125% FTP - 30 seconds easy spinning
  • Cool Down: 15 minutes at 150 Watts

Example session 2: "Base Mile Blast"

  • Warm Up Pyramid: 10 minutes: starting at 100 watts, building to 200 watts by the end
  • Main Set 1: 20 minutes at 60% FTP
  • Recover: 4 minutes spin it out
  • Repeat the above four/five times
  • Cool Down: 15 minutes at 150 Watts

Base Mile Blast


Example session 3: "Sustained Tempo"

  • Warm Up Pyramid: 10 minutes starting at 100 watts, building to 200 watts by the end
  • Main Set 1: 20 minutes at 85% FTP
  • Recover: 3 minutes spin it out
  • Main Set 2: 20 minutes at 85% FTP
  • Recover: 3 minutes spin it out
  • Main Set 3: 20 minutes at 85% FTP
  • Cool Down: 15 minutes at 150 Watts

These session are ideally done using a power meter head unit that has an interval function such as the PowerTap Joule GPS. The advantage of this is that you can upload the data to a program such as PowerAgent after your session and then analyse your intervals. It is likely that you will see a fall in power towards the end of your intervals, especially on the harder sets such as "TT Turbo Booster"; you should make it an objective of your training to avoid this "fading" and ensure that you are still able to keep pushing all the way to the end of the final interval to mimic finishing a time trial or race at the highest possible wattage. You can also use the analysis to spot if you are going out too hard at the start of your intervals, and therefore if you need to work on your pacing.

If you have to train indoors. Do it productively with a power meter!

Sustained Tempo